Active reading and written communication

Introduction
Active reading and good writing go hand in hand. When you engage in active reading, you are reading to understand, retain, and experience what the author has written, and it often leads to critically thinking about what you read. When you write well using FAST, it is easier for the reader to identify exactly what you are communicating, and why. As a writer, your goal is to write in a way that enables the reader to engage in active reading.
Do you sometimes have trouble remembering things you just read? These steps might help:
Just Read an Article and Now Have no Recollection of What You Read? Follow These 5 Steps to Recall What You Read With Productive Reading.
Instructions
Now, let’s see how well written communication and active reading correspond. First, read the following New York Times article:
2020 Olympics Logo Is Discarded After Plagiarism Accusations [PDF].
Then, download the Active Reading and Written Communication Template [DOCX] for this activity, answer the questions, and upload your completed activity in Week 3.
Write your answers in well-developed sentences or short paragraphs. Focus on offering your opinions, rather than providing right or wrong answers.